raleigh auto accident statistics

Raleigh Motor Vehicle Accident Statistics

2443 Lynn Road
Suite 208
Raleigh, NC 27612
Tel: (919) 787-9944
Fax: (919) 783-0458
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Using statistics to predict North Carolina auto accidents

The law of averages virtually guarantees that you will be in a motor vehicle accident at some point in your life and may require the assistance of a Raleigh car accident lawyer at Marcari, Russotto, Spencer & Balaban But is it possible to reduce your risk of a car, truck or motorcycle accident in North Carolina? These statistics indicate that your risk of accident injuries can be reduced by avoiding certain activities and types of vehicles.

High-risk automobiles involved in car crashes

Certain types of vehicles are statistically more likely to be involved in automobile accidents requiring the help of a North Carolina car accident lawyer:

  • SUVs — Vehicles with higher centers of gravity, such as SUVs, vans, and pickup trucks, are 40 percent more susceptible to rollover accidents, according to the Insurance Journal.
  • Motorcycles — Statistics indicate that motorcyclists are twice as likely to suffer severe injuries and fatalities in crashes as occupants of cars and trucks.
  • Black vehicles — Black cars are up to 12 percent more likely be involved in daylight crashes than white vehicles, according to police data assembled by Monash University on more than 850,000 accidents. At dawn and dusk, that figure rises to 47 percent. The study showed that white, gold, and yellow vehicles are statistically the least likely to be in an accident.

High-risk age and gender groups

Your likelihood of being injured in an automobile accident differs according to your age and gender:

  • Teens — According to the National Institute for Highway Safety, the crash rate per mile driven for 16- to19-year-olds is four times the risk for more experienced drivers. The risk is highest at age 16 — twice as high as the rate for 18- to 19-year-olds. Supervising the youngest drivers and not allowing them to drive alone is an effective deterrent.
  • Elderly — A 2008 study by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) shows that traffic fatalities involving older people account for 15 percent of all traffic fatalities and 18 percent of all pedestrian fatalities.
  • Men — Statistics reveal that 73 percent of all people killed in car crashes are men.

High-risk activities

Statistics indicate that certain activities increase the likelihood of a car, tractor-trailer truck or motorcycle accident with serious injury. For example:

  • Not wearing a seat belt — Seat belt statistics from NHTSA show that 75 percent of those thrown from a vehicle in a crash died. Just one percent of those ejected from the car were wearing seat belts.
  • Texting — Statistics from the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute (VTTI) reveal that of all mobile phone activities — including dialing, talking, or reaching for the phone — texting is the most dangerous. In fact, truck drivers who text while driving are 23.2 times more likely to be in a crash than non-distracted truckers.
  • Calling — VTTI statistics show that a driver dialing a mobile phone is nearly three times more likely to be in a wreck than a non-distracted driver.
  • DUI — Drunk driving dramatically increases your risk of causing an accident. According to NHTSA, drunk driving deaths accounted for 32 percent of all U.S. car accident deaths in 2008.
  • Not wearing a motorcycle helmet — Wearing a helmet decreases head injuries — the most devastating injuries barring death — by more than 90 percent.
  • Taxiing — Being in a taxi increases your risk of accident with injuries nearly three and a half times. Statistics show that private passenger vehicles are involved in injury accidents at a rate of 12.3 accidents per 1,000 vehicles, compared to 50 per 1,000 vehicles for taxis.